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4th of July Traditions

Written by Birttni Peterson, RN
Resource Nurse, Empira

There is no doubt, that for many people, Independence Day is one of the most looked forward to days of the summer. What’s not to love? Time spent with family and friends, fireworks, tasty food, bonfires, and if we are lucky, as Minnesotans, nice weather. I’m pretty sure that most people understand the symbolism of the fireworks, like it says in the Star-Spangled Banner: And the rocket’s red glare, the bombs bursting in air. But for many people the 4th of July is like many other holidays; a perfect reason to get together and celebrate with family. Many of those families have traditions and unfortunately with this COVID virus right now most will not be able to celebrate as they would like.

Vintage American Flag With Sparklers And Smoke On Rustic Wooden Background - Independence Day Celebration ConceptWhat is the reason we celebrate with fireworks, parades, and red white and blue on the 4th day of July? Well, here’s a brief history on it.

The Revolutionary War began in 1775 and ended in 1783. The cause of this war was due to growing tension between Great Britain’s 13 colonies and the Colonial Government. On July 2nd of 1776, there was a vote to gain their Independence, it wasn’t until two days later that representatives from the 13 colonies and Continental Congress officially adopted the Declaration of Independence.

“Fun fact, John Adams thought that July 2nd would be the date that Americans would celebrate their independence.”

Now, I’m not much of a history buff… but do you know who is? Our good friend Andy Griffith.

A family tradition of mine is adventuring to my Grandparent’s house in Deerwood Minnesota. We would attend the Crosby-Ironton parade during the day. Our parade spot was right across from a Dairy Queen, so of course we always bought a treat before the parade started… even if it was only 10 o’clock in the morning. The parades have been getting shorter and shorter each year, but average to be a little over an hour. Which for a kid looking to fill her bag with candy, it wasn’t long enough. We would then make the drive home to grill hamburgers and hot dogs for lunch and if my parents were lucky, us kids would let them take a nap before our evening festivities. We would finish our 4th of July day off by being mesmerized by fireworks in the evening. What are your family traditions for Independence Day?

Like I said earlier, the 4th of July, 2020, for most Americans, is going to be celebrated differently this year. Those most affected are the residents of long term care facilities. A lack of togetherness with their families will only be amplified during this holiday. Although recently the MN Department of Health has put out guidance for long term care facilities to have outdoor visitations, it just won’t be the same.

But there are a few other ways that you can celebrate with your loved ones this 4th of July.

Bring the tradition to them. Since visitors are not allowed in nursing communities and we don’t know how the outdoor visitations will work, bringing the tradition to them may be a bit more difficult this year. A way you can still celebrate with your loved one is by decorating the outside of their window with an American Flag, window decals, and/or flowers.

Cute American Kids watching Fourth of July ParadeCall and Reminisce. If you aren’t able to carry out your normal family traditions, call and reminisce about what you have done in the years past. Take it one step further by writing down your 4th of July memories and make it into a keepsake for you and your loved one(s).

Just remember that the biggest thing for people facing tough times, especially around holidays, is that they know you are here for them and that they are cared for.

Firework and bokeh lights at night in the colors of the flag from the united states of america (blue, white and red)Resources
https://www.history.com/topics/american-revolution/american-revolution-history
https://www.timeanddate.com/holidays/us/independence-day

Click to access ltcoutdoor.pdf

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Top Ten Sleep Disturbances – #7 Pain

Written by Heather Johnson, RN
Resource Nurse, Empira

A Serious Intruder on Restorative Sleep

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A recent poll of the American public, found that 21% of Americans experience chronic pain and 36% had had acute pain in the past week. Combine those totals, and it equates to 57%, leaving only 43% of Americans who report being pain free. Pain ranks as number seven in the Top Ten Sleep Disturbances.

People with pain often report feeling less control over their sleep. They report being worried about lack of sleep and its effects on their health. Worry leads to stress. Stress and poor health, often go hand-in-hand and can often be linked to fragmented sleep. Fragmented sleep translates to interrupted sleep which prevents a person from receiving 7-9 hours. Seven to nine hours of uninterrupted sleep is necessary for restorative sleep. Restorative sleep is needed for physical and emotional healing. Sleep loss is known to contribute to feelings of depression and fatigue, which in turn can increase a person’s pain perception. Research indicates that if a person experiences poor sleep due to pain one night, they are more likely to experience pain the next night, and the next night, and so on. We know that pain can be a serious intruder on restorative sleep.

Pain, depression, and fatigue are interrelated. Further, pain often is linked to insomnia, and, when both of these problems coexist, the perfect recipe for additional problems has been created. Additionally, evidence suggests that sleep loss increases reports of pain, when you don’t sleep well you have a heightened sensitivity to pain. This vicious cycle of poor sleep due to pain affects multiple areas of a person’s day to day life.

What can a person do?

  • Determine the source of the pain. Is it physical pain? Is it emotional pain? Get to the root of the problem, identify the root cause. Once you’ve identified the source, address the source with the right solution or intervention.
  • Seek direction from your medical provider.
  • Exercising or stretching of sore muscles by stimulating blood flow and easing pain
  • Evaluate your positioning in bed; your pillow, mattress, and environment.
  • Retrain you brain to think of something positive as you head to bed for the night.
  • Research non-pharmacological interventions such as, relaxation techniques (focus on your breathing), guided imagery, aroma therapy, heat/cold, and massage.
    If it’s physical pain, consider a longer acting pain reliever, one that will last throughout the night.

Don’t let pain rob you from a good night of sleep!

References:
Cosio, D., Lin, E; PPM: Practical Pain Management. Disturbed Sleep: Causes and Treatments. 2018. https://www.google.com/amp/s. Accessed November 20, 2018.
National Sleep Foundation. Recommended Sleep. 2015. https://sleepfoundation.org/how-sleep-works/how-much-sleep-dowe-really-need. Accessed November 20, 2018.
Onen, SH., Alloui, A., Gross, A., Eschallier, A., Dubray, C. 2001. The effects of total sleep deprivation, selective sleep interruption and sleep recovery on pain tolerance thresholds in healthy subjects. J Sleep Res. 10, 35-42. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2869.2001.00240.x

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Falling From Grace

Author:  Heather Johnson, RN Clinical Educator & Program Specialist

Without a doubt, I can say almost 100% of our population has fallen at some point in their lifetime.  When I pose this as a question to participants in educational sessions I often find a handful of individuals that honestly report they have never fallen.  Unless you are some type of super-human and are as agile as a mountain goat or monkey, you have fallen at some point in your lifetime and the odds are you will fall again.

My older sister was nicknamed “Grace” in our childhood years as she mastered the uncanny ability to fall even while going UP the stairs in our home.  We often referred to this ability as her “talent” and would laugh if we were present to witness her mishap.  As we grew older and more experienced I came to understand how the consequences of her missteps could carry horrific injuries.

While a fall for any age can have serious results, the impact of a fall for an older adult can be grave.

Are you aware one in four Americans aged 65 and older falls each year?  Every 11 seconds, an older adult is seen and treated in a hospital emergency room due to injuries sustained from a fall?  Hip fractures, broken bones, hematomas and traumatic brain injuries are often the result of a fall for those over the age of 80.  One in five hip-fracture patients will die within one year of their injury.  Yes, they will die.  The trajectory is not in their favor.

I spent this past week at the 4th Annual National Falls Prevention Conference in Philadelphia and took part in a learning experience that left me feeling both extremely positive and proud about the work we are doing in falls prevention.   Simultaneously I was overcome with a desire to continue to push harder and work for better outcomes for our seniors.  While in Philadelphia, I had the opportunity to see the very steps Sylvester Stallone made internationally recognizable in the movie Rocky, the ever-famous steps of the Institute of Art Museum. In the movie, Rocky not only climbs these steps in different weather elements, but he runs.  He runs, he trains, makes himself stronger, and he becomes more agile each day.  Rocky was relentless in his training with his desire to ultimately become the Heavy Weight Boxing Champion. While you may not be training to become the next world famous boxer, we certainly can be left inspired by his grit and undying desire to improve himself.  At the age of 71, Sylvester Stallone makes it well known that he takes his physical health and exercise seriously.

What can we do?  Evidence-based best practices support assisting individuals with maintaining (or even improving) mobility, balance and core muscle strengthening through regular exercise.  These are proven ways to greatly reduce the chances of falling at all ages.  This alone is the number one way to prevent falls!  The National Council on Aging offers a wide range of exercise and for all abilities.

https://www.ncoa.org/healthy-aging/falls-prevention/   

By encouraging and promoting activity, you are not only reducing the risk of falling for an older adult, you are also encouraging their opportunities for socialization which, in turn, has been proven to decrease episodes of both depression and anxiety.

 Falling is not a normal part of aging and there are numerous ways that are proven to reduce the chances of having a fall.

I encourage you as a care provider, a son or daughter of aging parents, as a grandchild or as a friend to a senior, to not only consider the physical environment, footwear, and eye glasses when striving for preventing a fall, but to also consider what you can do to help promote movement, core strengthening and social opportunities for the aging.   By doing so, maybe we can all extend each other a bit more “Grace.”

Written by:  Heather Johnson RN, Clinical Educator and Program Specialist

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